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Skull Queen in a Day

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Skull Queen in a Day

It had been a long time coming. Tesia and I had been in contact about climbing a wall for a little over a year. Last season didn’t pan out for us as a pair because of her objectives and my full time job in San Francisco. But this year things were a lot different. I had been hanging around Yosemite thinking and talking about doing a wall but not making any moves. Erik Sloan caught wind of my desires and mentioned something to Tesia. This is where the Skull Queen in a day was born. I had headed back to Tahoe for a bit and Tesia and I communicated here and there. She had several things she wanted to do and I was just siked to do anything. Though I must say I was more attracted to the objectives that didn’t involve hauling. I looked over the things she wanted to do and quickly said lets do Lurking Fear in a day! It had been something I had been wanting to do for awhile and honestly I had never heard of the Skull Queen. She quickly came back with well lets first start with Skull Queen in a day and go from there. A quick glance at my Big Wall book, and I was siked! Skull Queen is situated just right of the South Face on the Washington Column and depending on what book you look at it, it goes at V 5.8 C2+ and is only 11 pitches. The perfect warm up for a much more committing climb like Lurking Fear and to get all the cob webs dusted off from the winter season of inactivity. 

We decided to blast on the day after memorial day weekend a Tuesday just to let all of the crowds leave before we got in. I drove down to Yosemite from Tahoe Monday afternoon. When I got there Tesia and I met in the meadow to sort gear and get ready for the big day the next day. We discussed strategy and gear and at about 9pm decided the best idea was to sleep at the base. Then it was go time. We quick packed gear and double checked everything. Food, water, gear, ropes, sunglasses… I drove to the stables only to find that they no longer allow overnight parking. This threw a wrench in our plans and I was feeling anxious about the coming day. We finally concluded that the best option was to park at curry and bike to the trailhead. My massive haul bag on my back and our day pack strapped to my front I felt unstable as we peddled away from the vehicles. It was 10pm and I knew the next 24hrs where going to be long. 

I followed Tesia through the woods and to the base where we stashed our bikes. I was feeling tired from the previous days of running and the long drive. We quickly transitioned into hiking and with a little route finding difficulty was on our way to the cliff. We barely spoke but hiked through the darkness. Head down and sweat pouring of my skin I watched all the insects scurry across the ground as my headlamp exposed them from the dark. Quickly we were at the base of cliff. Now it was just time to find an appropriate bivy spot to sleep for the night. We hiked along the base for a bit until we came to a nice overhung rock creating a flat place to sleep. Now close to midnight we setup camp. Tesia had a sleeping pad but I did not, so I flacked the rope out and laid my sleeping bag on top of it. We laid there looking at the stars and chatting for a bit before Tesia fell asleep. I tossed and turned almost all night. The rope didn’t make as nice of a crash pad as I had hoped or maybe it was just the excitement.

The alarmed chirped at 4:30am and I sprung from rope bed. I must have only slept about an hour. Tesia started to drink her coffee and I was wide awake. We tried to use the bathroom and started to head on our way. By the time we reached the base it was close to 6am. Another party showed up and we chatted as Tesia took the lead. She freed the first two pitches while I jugged. The plan was for me to free the third and then I would take the next block of 4 pitches. I made it up the third pitch much slower than expected and more french free than anything. I belayed Tesia up and was headed on my way for the 4th pitch. This was the crux for me. It was the heat of the day and I was rusty on aiding. I battled my way up over the roof and up the perfect low angle crack to another roof which proved to be the crux. My rope got stuck three times causing me to aid and then down aid three times to get the rope unstuck. By the time I got to the anchor I knew that it had taken me too long. I was sun burnt, dehydrated, and worked. I short fixed only to realize I had forgotten the tag line and would not be able to tag up any gear. It was a bolt ladder so I figured I could salvage what I could and continued climbing. 

Crisis mode was not over yet. I made it up the thin section and fifi-ed into the first bolt. I had to pee really bad. I made one more move and then realized it was an emergancy. Drapped in pounds of gear and hanging from my harness I peed my pants. Shit I thought I’m going to be all wet and gross all day now. The good news was that the wind had just started to pickup and my pants almost dried immediately I looked down at Tesia who had just arrived at the belay and said “Hey do my pants look wet”. She laughed and was like yep. To which I responded in light heartedness "yep totally just peed myself". After that mini epic the bolt ladder went fast and instead of taking the next two pitches I waited for Tesia and she took the next two. The 7th pitch required a few mandatory free moves even for the follower. I was not siked as I mantled on to the belay ledge with nothing but my grigri connected. The sun was still high and we only had 4 more pitches to go. I didn’t want to be descending in the dark and was feeling apprehensive about the whole situation. I was scared, tired, smelly, and we still had the three crux pitches left. I made a suggestion about bailing to which Tesia said she had thought about it but she wanted to go atleast the next two pitches and see how we feel. As she left the belay I knew we were going to the top.

Tesia made quick and easy progress of the next two C2 pitches. I jugged fast behind her and I felt like we had finally hit a stride. The first half of the route was just a warm up. Standing below the last crux pitch number 10. Tesia looked at me and I knew it was mine. She had just led a block of 4 pitches not to mention two of the hardest pitches. She asked if I wanted my headlamp and I firmly said no it’ll be motivation to climb faster. I missed the crucial beta to stay left at the belay and ended up making some very scary moves close off the deck and wasted valuable time. Once I finally got moving I was moving. My hands bleeding I made my way steady up the loose crumbly crack having pieces of granite explode in my face as I tested my pro. I clipped into the lower out tat for a second and in that split second I was falling. The old tat had exploded and I was wizing down to be caught by my daisy.  No time to stop I kept moving. Now was the scary part two hook moves, followed by two rivet moves, followed by two hook moves and the anchor. Hook, hook, rivet, rivet, cam, hook, hook, bam! The smell of hot metal rose from the rock and little chunks of granite sprayed into my eyes. I was run out on a traverse and clipped into two hooks. The hook I was fifi-ed into blew and just like that I was back on my daisy being caught by my other hook. I couldn’t believe that my hook caught a static full length daisy fall but I was thankful. I clipped the anchors and Tesia jugged up behind.

Miss informed again Tesia changed into her free shoes to free the final pitch. We switched on our headlamps and she blasted off the belay. It turned out to be much harder than 10b and she pulled through most of the pitch. I followed behind on the jugs and we were finally done. In a full on 15 hour day up on the rock. Now was the decision to rap the repel route or to walk down the north dome gully. We decided to repel for speed reasons. We got setup and made the first repel from the Skull Queen to the well traveled South Face repel route. As we started to pull the rope we realized this wasn’t going to be easy. The rope got stuck. We stood tired and exhausted facing the sad decision that we would need to re-lead this pitch to free the rope. The good news was that it was 5.2. Tesia, having done it before, led up and freed the rope. I promised that if it got stuck again I would go up and free it. A few more tugs on the rope and it was stuck again. Tesia decided it was easier for her to lead it again and went up and freed the rope. This time she was certain it wouldn’t get stuck but once again…. a few more pulls lodged the rope again. Tesia like a real trooper went up and freed the rope one final time. I can’t express how thankful I was that she did that over and over again. As we setup for the next repel we kept hoping it wouldn’t get stuck again. 10 repels later we were down at the base but far from being done. We hiked back to our bivy, packed all of our stuff up, and started the hike back to the bikes. This time we laughed and talked about how ridiculous the day was. When we reached the bikes we were on the home stretch back to vehicles. And by the time we got to the cars it was 3am. I couldn’t believe the day we had. As I threw a few things in the van I headed straight to the curry showers were I scrubbed the hard day off of my skin.

My sausage wall fingers lasted for about three days and my puffy swollen sunburnt lips lasted about the same time. But like all big pushes life moves on as quickly as it stopped. And I know Tesia and I will get back at it again even if its not till the cool months.

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The Dark Arts

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The Dark Arts

The dark arts as many refer to them. It is the art of flying your body. Such a powerful thing and yet such a morbid sport. Friends, family members, loved ones, they all have passed. More will continue to pass. And the people who loved them most will continue to fly. And as we non practicers stand on the side lines we will mourn, and we will continue to support them in everything they do.

I have had the pleasure to be very close to a practicer of the dark arts. He is the most naturally talent person I have ever met. He can onsight 5.14 off the couch and can free solo a slack line he’s never walked before. He has surfed Mavericks and can ski off a mountain without ever thinking twice. But his true art is in his flight. He is a BASE jumper, and I am sure you have never heard of him before. But if you feel like reading an inspirational story about a talented dude here is a link. http://mojagear.com/climber-profile You’ll also get to see some of my photographs in the article!

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The Eastside

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The Eastside

The Eastern Sierra... one of the most beautiful places you'll ever go. The mountains are tall and the rocks are steep. I really can't get enough of this place. Venturing out east is always a pleasure. I know for a fact I will be spending a lot more time out there. This trip was climbing focused but as the time gets closer to 2017 it will become more and more running focused. Big plans and scouting missions are to be had. Stay tuned.


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The Hopeless and The Ropeless

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The Hopeless and The Ropeless

After sitting in the Tuolumne parking lot all morning we finally motivated to get out and climb. We call it the "lower mundane" start when you get moving around noon. (In contrast to the typical alpine start when you start at the early early hours.) We made fast time free soloing Tenaya peak passing parties left and right. It is crazy how fast and easy climbing is when you don't have to think about anything. 12 or so pitches later we made it to the top in a little under an hour. The hopeless and the ropeless. Welcome to the cool days of fall.

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The Gunsite

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The Gunsite

It was only fitting that the gunsite was smokey. Scrambling up the gunsite between middle and lower cathedral had been on my list of things to do for months. After choking on smoke for hours the day before we decided to scramble the gully on a whim. We did no research and had no map. We just looked at the gunsite from El Cap meadow and hoped we would have minimal bushwhacking.

We hit the beta for the gunsite on the first try. We parked the van in one of the first pull outs after bridal veil falls and hiked up the horse path.  When the edge of lower cathedral was visible we ascended a boulder field until we hit the cliff. Skirting around left we picked up a trail that hugged close to the right side of the gunsite. The climbing on the sides of the cliff looked epic and hardly climbed. We will definitely be back.

 Soon the gully steepened out and we took the easier line up and left. Some 4th class moves spit us out into a chimney where we looked right and found some fixed lines. Hand over handing coupled with a few 5th class moves and we were on the top. Honestly I wasn’t very excited about the sketchy down climb we had to do. Straight back from the gunsite though is the top of bridal veil falls. Bridal veil falls creek is said to be some of the best fly fishing in the valley. Beautiful deep granite pools of water. Corbin promptly stripped down and jumped in. I settled for icing my swollen still fractured foot. Barefoot we walked to the edge of the fall. Late season so the water isn’t flowing very much. We sat on the slick slick ledge looking straight down on all the tourists enjoying the falls.

Next was time to down climb the gunsite. Good hands and bomber feet made the down climbing go quickly. Back to the van in no time. Glad I got to check off another adventure hike on my list. Highly recommended. But I have to say El Cap gully is still my favorite!

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Big Sleep But Not Sleepy, Shuteye Ridge

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Big Sleep But Not Sleepy, Shuteye Ridge

I don't spend nearly enough time in the southern Sierra. Crazy how remote and spectacular the climbing is down there. Excited to get out and checkout more of the area. If you haven't picked up the Shuteye Ridge climbing book grab it now! Literally a life time of amazing climbs with no lines or waiting. Here are a few photos from the trip.


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Stormy Weather in the High Sierra

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Stormy Weather in the High Sierra

The theme of my five days running and climbing in the high Sierra was bailing. It seemed like I could not escape the bad weather. The day I drove into Tuolumne I could feel the draw to run tall mountains so that's what I did. Getting a late start was not ideal with the current weather patterns but I went for it anyways. A quick glance at the map I picked Mt Dana and Mt Gibbs. After blasting up Dana I was in for a real treat trying to descend into the saddle between the two peaks. I gingerly picked my way down the steep face of Dana sending boulders the size of me whirling down the cliff. Finely down in the saddle I was greeted with a beautiful view of Mono lake and kidney lake a few pictures and some fueling then I was off headed for Gibbs summit. I made quick progress of the ridge but the running become more cautious as the exposure become more extreme and the weather darker. I was on the final push for the summit when the running turned into climbing and it began to rain. Alone in the mountains I made the quick decision to bail. It is always better to air on the side of caution in my opinion. It felt like I descended forever off of Mt Gibbs. Picking my way down another steep face but thankfully not as loose as Dana. Finally I was down in the most beautiful valley. Tons of little streams splitting and rejoining over and over again with some of the softest grass to run on. As the rain drizzled down I happily skipped across the streams trying to make it back towards the road. It was a nice relief from the steep rocky hours of running before. Soon I was in the tree line bonking and it was raining harder. It felt like I ran in that valley forever. Following trails that would quickly disappear and then reform again. I couldn't tell if I was hallucinating or if it was real. Alone deep in the woods not exactly sure where I was I continued to run in the direction I thought right. Until finally sweet victory I hit the road. I short mile run on the road brought me back to my car just in time to meet sonja at the store.

But that was a mild bail compared to the storm I got caught in two days later. Sonja and I decided to do a mellow alpine climb in the High Sierra. The Sierras aren't known for bad weather quite actually the opposite getting coined the term the fair weather range. Bear Creek Spire was the objective doing the North Arête a funky 5.8. We decided to get a 4am start for the 6 mile hike to the base. When the sun finally rose we were stoked to not see a single cloud in the sky. This would change quickly. You can't see what the weather is like until you are about 5pitches up. We had some route finding difficulty which set us back a few hours. We could see the clouds building but didn't think much of it. By the time we created around the arête and got a clear shit of the weather it was bad. Thunder lightning and ominous clouds. We knew we had to bail. We made quick work of six interesting repels and about a hundred feet of 4th class down climbing. The storms were coming from both directions but we made it off dry. It wasn't till we began the long hike out till the lightning, thunder, rain, and hail engulfed us. Heads down we hiked to the rhythm of the hail on our jackets and made it out alive and soaked to the bone. Turns out the weather forecast had changed from a 20% chance of rain to a 70% chance of rain just over night while we were camping away from service. Character building. Lessons learned: never forget how to tie a water knot!

Leaving the Sierras for a bit while this funky weather pattern blows through. On the road in the van to Colorado with my main man Lopi riding shot gun. Time to run some real tall mountains and hopefully avoid all epic weather.

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Toulumne What Dreams Are Made Of

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Toulumne What Dreams Are Made Of

The weather in the Yosemite called for rain and more rain. Friday night Molly and I drove into a damp valley and contemplated if climbing Cathedral peak would be the best idea with the impending weather. The last thing you want to do is be on the top of a peak with a ton of gear on when lightning strikes. However we were stoked so we decided a 3am start was the only way to guarantee we wouldn't get wet (or electrocuted). Everything about the day was perfect and we were safe and sound back in the car when the rain and lightning started to come down. It has been a long time since I've laughed so hard that I cried but this weekend I did it over and over again. Good company. A weekend I won't soon forget.

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Canada to Alaska

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Canada to Alaska

I flew to Calgary on Wednesday night where I met up with my best friend from college Nikki. We ended up sleeping in a Walmart parking lot that night and blasting off for adventures the next morning. We hit Banff climbed a fun multipitch, had a few beers (I really struggled... I don't drink) with some cool Canadians, and checked out the most bizarre castle! The next morning we got the beta from the locals and hit up the back of Lake Louise. When we crawled out of the back of Nikki's car (where we spooned every night) there was a light dusting of snow covering Banff but we decided to climb anyways. We loaded up by noon and were headed to Jasper stopping along the way to eat and run are legs out.

We drove all night and maybe a slept a little. By the time we made it to the Yukon we were stoked to be there. So stoked we cracked out the skis to get in some turns. We were close to the Alaska border so we headed over to cell service and more stellar skiing. We hung out in Skagway the next day doing some running and hiking until we finally caught the 6 hour ferry to Juneau. The ferry ride took awhile but the epic mountains in every direction took my breath away. In Juneau we checked out the town and then jetted off on a run hike out to the massive Mendenhall glacier where we explored tons of tight and big ice caves! It was truely epic. I caught my flight back to SF were now all I have are pictures missing Nikki and the breakfast bell peppers. I'll be back soon Canada and Alaska!

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Finding the Gully

The best adventure hike I've ever done in Yosemite or for that matter really anywhere else. El Cap Gully: hike up the gully, eat a snack on the top of El Capitan, descend the East ledges. A quick day with a lot of elevation!

-Naomi

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Ice Ice Baby

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Ice Ice Baby

I'll be the first to say I really really hate the snow, but ice... I love it. I don't know what it is about ice but it will always blow me away. It's hard to believe at one point it was just water. I can't put into words how spectacular my trip to Ouray was so here is a picture of one of the last climbs we did. It was 35 meters and had a little bit of everything from stemming to overhung. Enjoy.

Naomi

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How to be a Crack Addict with a Crack Machine in 5hrs

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How to be a Crack Addict with a Crack Machine in 5hrs

You may be addicted to crack if you try to stick your body parts in parallel sided objects and then hang from them, day dream about Indian Creek, have noticeable scars on the back of your hands and ankles, are reading this article... A side effect of being addicted to crack is wanting to climb crack all the time. So you've searched the internet looking for someone to just lay out a crack machine, plain and simple, so all you have to do is build it or pay someone to build it. Well I think I'm a pretty competent Googler and I came up dry. Everything I saw was mounted to a wall or a garage or outside. I mean it must be nice to live somewhere you can do that but I move every year and live in a tiny apartment. I can't just go mounting shit on the walls.

So you're in this dilemma... You're a tiny but strong independent woman with essentially no nearby friends, no access to a climbing gym, and addicted to crack. The only solution is clearly to design and build everything you've ever wanted in a crack machine by yourself.

Here are my step by step instructions to success!

Step one

: get stuck in the LAX airport for 7 hrs. It'll give you plenty of time to brainstorm ideas and use those years in engineering school to sketch up mocks.

Step two

: second guess your abilities to build something from scratch with your lack of power tool knowledge and all around knowledge of building anything. (Other than software of course)

Step three

: tell someone [like a man] about your idea so they can tell you your dumb and it'll never work. This will give you the fire and motivation to prove them wrong.

Step four

: take off work. The weekends are precious and must be saved for real outdoor climbing.

Step five

: take your designs and go to home depot. If your expect any one at home depot to help you your expectations are too high.

Step six

: make cuts, buy all the supplies, carry around, and load into car all by yourself because I did ask for help and not a single worker was around. Remember its good training your going to have to unload it from the car by yourself at home anyways. Optimism.

Step seven

: unload car. Make sure to carry all the loads up at least two flights of stairs. Again by yourself. Took me 12 trips to the car.

Step eight

: your probably pretty hungry so eat a snack and high five yourself for being independent. While your at it call your dad or dad like figure because he's probably pretty awesome and will give you words of encouragement.

Step nine

: start measuring make sure to be accurate and pick crack sizes your willing to stuff body parts into. I chose a 5.5inch 2inch and 4inch cracks.

Step ten

: pre drill all of this holes all 52 of those holes. Preferably outside so you don't have wood chips all over your house.

Step eleven

: stare at the boards and think of how nice it would be to have someone to do all this work for you.

Step twelve

: time to assemble. Transport all those boards to the room they will live in because once assembled no way you'll be able to move it by yourself.

Step thirteen

: stick everything together upside down by matching up those holes you just drilled and jamming lag bolts into them this actually goes really fast and you finally get to see your hard work pay off

Step fourteen

: THE HARDEST STEP flip it over onto its legs... You'll probably be able to get it onto its side by yourself but all the way onto its legs... It weighs like 250lbs. Sooo rig some rope and lift with your legs, or call your climbing partner... Climbing is a partner sport so you have to have at least one friend.

Congratulations you are now

97%

done.

The last step is to reinforce the boards because there totally going to bow if you don't.

Drill through all the boards and reinforce with a threaded pipe and nuts. I did about every two feet. The closer the better.

Tada! Buy some climbing holds and mount them on the outside now you have a full body workout and can satisfy your crack addiction day or night!

Anyways for a more serious talk about my crack machine feel free to comment or send me an email I'd love to talk your ear off about the details! Measurements, bolt sizes, lumber, etc...

Cheers

Naomi

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A Creek-end to Remember

So this video is not my best work, and I know this. I unfortunately didn't get the footage that I wanted and shot everything on a Nexus 7 tablet. So when I put the video into Adobe Premier and started editing my heart just wasn't in it. So the moral of the story is I am sorry if I waste a few minutes of your life if you do in fact choose to watch it.

Cheers!

-Naomi and Lopi

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Indian Creek and Potash Road

I am currently working on a video of my latest trip to Indian Creek/ Potash Road. Until then I decided to post some of my favorite pictures and share a few words of how amazing the trip was! The trip started out with a quick day at potash road where I led up a few slab routes and even ran the last route out for about 40 feet seen below...

5.9 

She-la the Peeler

 Potash Road

We then headed into Indian Creek and decided our next day would be to send the South Six Shooter. Unfortunately when we got to the base we were stuck behind a group of 12 who was stuck behind a group of 4 so we turned around and ended the day bouldering near the base.

That night we sat around a campfire with Cedar Wright his wife Nellie there dog Gus and two friends Sean and Robert. It was an epic night which was followed by an awesome day climbing at the 2nd Meat Wall with Cedar and the gang.

My friend Tyler and Andrew on 

Unknown R of Tube Steaks

We even got to watch Cedar launch is video helicopter off towards the six shooters

Cedar Wright with his helicopter

Needless to say it was an amazing trip that ended with climbing one of the coolest looking routes off potash road called pocket rocket and Tyler beasted it out on lead.

5.10c 

Pocket Rocket

Along with all this amazing climbing I also got to do a little painting. One evening after a long day of climbing I perched myself on a hill at twilight and painted the sunset. Painting by head lamp can be quite the challenge.

Head lamp on my almost finished painting

-Naomi

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First Bouldering Competition

Here's to my first blog post. I am a blogger of few words because I personally would rather look at pictures and videos. So here is a short post about my first bouldering competition. As a predominantly crack climber I am the first but not last to say I really suck at bouldering. So it was nice to compete at a more laid back and fun competition. I entered in the Rec league [V0-V2] but ended up competing in the Intermediate league [V3-V5] and getting last place. But at least I proved to myself I was stronger and better than Rec!  Here are a few photos.

Looking strong... but not climbing very strong. Also do I always stand this awkward?

Getting to do what I'm good at. Hand jamming for days!

Coolest problem to date! Toe hook, hand stand, sit up start.

Hey and I won this sweet guide book to the high sierras! Time to do my own Sufferfest?

PS: Lopi and I are headed to Indian Creek so stay tuned for a more worth while blog post!

-Naomi

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